Video 25 Jul 695 notes

historical-nonfiction:

A vision of 2000, drawn by Jean-Marc Côté and other French artists to be used on cigar boxes and postcards, for the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. It’s actually kind of sad how little of this we have. Who wouldn’t want to travel by whale?

Photo 24 Jul 83 notes babylonfalling:

What Is a Beatnik?
These letters are written by 6th graders from a local east side public school and were collected for EVO.

babylonfalling:

What Is a Beatnik?

These letters are written by 6th graders from a local east side public school and were collected for EVO.

Photo 23 Jul 97 notes mapsontheweb:

Map of cartel influence in Mexico and smuggling routes 2011

mapsontheweb:

Map of cartel influence in Mexico and smuggling routes 2011

Photo 23 Jul 111 notes mapsontheweb:

Growth of undersea fiber optic cable network

More info and interactive hi-res map here.

mapsontheweb:

Growth of undersea fiber optic cable network

More info and interactive hi-res map here.

Video 22 Jul 383 notes

peashooter85:

Dungeons and Dragons, The Devil’s Board Game,

The granddaddy of all role playing board games, Dungeons and Dragons is perhaps also the most popular and important RPG in gaming history.  Introduced in 1974, D&D quickly became a hit game among youngsters, teens, and college aged gamers.  By 1980 it was the most popular game board game, with an estimated 3 million players and 750,000 copies being sold annually.  

Like all things new, it wasn’t unusual for D&D to earn the suspicion of older generations.  Many people thought the D&D was a corrupting influence on American youth, blaming the game for moral decline and leading to psychological illness.  Then in 1979 the disappearance of a college student named James Dallas Egbert III fanned the flames into a roaring inferno.

Egbert was a student of Michigan State University, and a troubled teen who was being forced by his overly controlling parents into a career he did not want to pursue.  On the night August 15th, 1979 Egbert disappeared after entering a steam tunnel.  A large search was conducted but the boy was never found.  His parents blamed his disappearance on his favorite game; Dungeons and Dragons, claiming that in a fit of D&D induced mania their son had a psychological break from reality and went off on a real life D&D adventure.  The story made national headlines, and faster than the roll of a dice the evils of D&D spread across the country.  As it turned out Egbert had entered the tunnels to commit suicide, but instead ran away to become an oil worker in Louisiana.  He was discovered several months later and forced to resume his education by his parents. He committed suicide a year later.

The truth behind Egbert’s disappearance did little to stem the tide of anti-D&D sentiment, especially when the cause was taken up by the growing Christian Conservative movement.  Soon preachers and televangelists such as Billy Graham, Pat Robertson, Oral Roberts, and Jerry Falwell were railing against the board game at the pulpit.  Fundamentalist Christians accused the game of having satanic influence, encouraging occultism, black magic, and witchcraft.  Christian groups decried the game as an instrument of the devil and a propagator of evil among the nation’s youth, causing murder and suicide. 

Reaction against D&D was far from rational.  Christian Groups often successfully pressured schools and colleges into banning the game. A few successful groups even convinced local government officials to adopt ordinances forbidding the game within their boroughs or towns.  Inspired by MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving), a woman named Patricia Pulling founded BADD (Bothered By Dungeons & Dragons) with the aim of banning the board game everywhere, and if that couldn’t be done, then suing the game into bankruptcy.  Other groups raised money from donors, bought as many D&D sets with it as possible, and destroyed them in large bonfires.

Dungeons & Dragons was not the only victim, but a host of other 80’s icons such as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Care Bears, Transformers, GI Joe, and many others faced similar accusations of satanic influence and evil.  In fact, the whole country was awash in a moral and religious panic over occultism and devil worship.  The subject became the focus of every talk show on TV.  The corporation Proctor & Gamble was accused of being a satanic company due to its centuries old logo, while rumors abounded that it’s president donated much of the company’s profits to The Church of Satan.  Hundreds of childcare workers were imprisoned on the charge of child abuse based on the claim that they had conducted “satanic rituals” on the children.  Many of the kids were toddlers, who were dragged into interrogation rooms and shouted at by detectives until they broke down and admitted to being the victims of weird satanic abuse. BADD head Patricia Pulling made the claim that 8% of the American population were satanists, which at the time amounted to around 20 million people.  When questioned by a reporter where she came up with that number, she claimed that 4% of teens and 4% of adults were satanists, hence 8%.  There was even a ridiculous claim parroted by the media that around 1 million people a year were murdered in occult human sacrifice rituals.  

The war on D&D and the satanic panic ended in the 1990’s when a number of scientific organizations debunked the rumors.  Among them were studies by Centers for Disease Control and the American Association of Suicidology which found that D&D had nothing to do with murder, suicide, or anti-social behavior.  Regardless the stigma is still held by a few.  In 2013, 700 Club leader Rev. Pat Robertson claimed on national TV that D&D, Harry Potter, and other “demonic games” was the source of teen suicide.

(Source: stuffyoushouldknow.com)

Photo 22 Jul 49 notes wilsonlibunc:

“Knowlege Wins. Public Library Books Are Free.” American Library Association poster published during World War I. From Documenting the American South, “North Carolinians and the Great War.”

wilsonlibunc:

Knowlege Wins. Public Library Books Are Free.” American Library Association poster published during World War I. From Documenting the American South, “North Carolinians and the Great War.”

Photo 20 Jul 87 notes historicaltimes:

An aerial view of Hiroshima, Japan, one year after the atomic bomb detonation. Taken July 20, 1946.

historicaltimes:

An aerial view of Hiroshima, Japan, one year after the atomic bomb detonation. Taken July 20, 1946.

Video 18 Jul 349 notes

centuriespast:

Mirror of Famous Women of Japan (Honchō Meifu Kagami)

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Japanese, 1839 - 1892. Published by Arakawa Tōbei; 9 banchi 2 chōme, Bakuro-chō, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo.

Meiji Period (1868-1912)

1880 (published 1883)

Color woodcut (triptych)

Philadelphia Museum of Art

via C.P..
Link 17 Jul 42 notes Studying for Funsies - Firing Mechanisms»

18thcenturylove:

Well the carriage reference seems to be so popular, I thought I might make another post on some things I’m studying. This week, firing mechanisms! (Again, to all my re-enactor followers, please correct me if I’m wrong!)

Serpentine Lock - Classic Matchlock (mid-15th Century)

image

Snap…

Photo 17 Jul 864 notes historicaltimes:

Jimi Hendrix in uniform during his time in the US Army, 1961

historicaltimes:

Jimi Hendrix in uniform during his time in the US Army, 1961

Photo 16 Jul 3,932 notes royalbks:

The Outsider and Others | H.P. Lovecraft | 1939
First Edition. The first publication from Arkham House and first collection of Lovecraft’s stories, published posthumously, which would go on to not only to have an enormous influence on horror fiction, but on film and music as well. Very Good plus in an about Very Good dust jacket. Light bumps to the top corners, and a slight lean. Jacket is rubbed, with light toing to the spine and rear panel, with chips and tears overall. Still, a mostly presentable example of the scarce dust jacket.

Oh, man, so much better than the cover of every 70s mass market Lovecraft paperback.

royalbks:

The Outsider and Others | H.P. Lovecraft | 1939

First Edition. The first publication from Arkham House and first collection of Lovecraft’s stories, published posthumously, which would go on to not only to have an enormous influence on horror fiction, but on film and music as well.

Very Good plus in an about Very Good dust jacket. Light bumps to the top corners, and a slight lean. Jacket is rubbed, with light toing to the spine and rear panel, with chips and tears overall. Still, a mostly presentable example of the scarce dust jacket.

Oh, man, so much better than the cover of every 70s mass market Lovecraft paperback.

Photo 16 Jul 214 notes centuriespast:

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky
Benjamin West, English (born America), 1738 - 1820
c. 1816
Oil on slate
Philadelphia Museum of Art

He made his son do it while he stood under an umbrella! Father of the year. 

centuriespast:

Benjamin Franklin Drawing Electricity from the Sky

Benjamin West, English (born America), 1738 - 1820

c. 1816

Oil on slate

Philadelphia Museum of Art

He made his son do it while he stood under an umbrella! Father of the year. 

via C.P..
Photo 16 Jul 1,298 notes collectivehistory:

Watching the Apollo 11 launch, July 16, 1969

collectivehistory:

Watching the Apollo 11 launch, July 16, 1969

Video 15 Jul 269 notes

obitoftheday:

missedinhistory:

ourpresidents:

Barkers for Britain Tag 

Before America entered World War II, Fala served as president of Barkers for Britain, a nationwide effort by American dog lovers to support nonmilitary aid to Britain. Membership in the club helped support Bundles for Britain, an organization that collected cash contributions and donations of clothing, blankets, and other basic necessities for the British people. The organization presented membership tags like this one to dog owners who contributed to British war relief.

As president of Barkers for Britain, Fala received letters from around the nation, including this note (with photograph) from “Cire Noir Butler,” head of the group’s Austin, Texas, branch.

-from the Roosevelt Library 

Fala makes an appearance in our archival episode on historical pooches, from the Katie and Candace era.

Obit of the Day featured the woman who created Barkers for Britain back in January 2013. She died at 103.

Fala was given to FDR by his mistress. Or, depending on your view of history, one of his mistresses. 

Photo 15 Jul 42,202 notes nevver:

Seizure of indigenous land, 1776-1887

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