Video 19 Oct 2,711 notes

Favourite Moments from Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey (6/?)

- From Episode 3: When Knowledge Conquered Fear

(Source: child-of-thecosmos)

via History!.
Photo 18 Oct 20,972 notes bluart106:

Two men dancing, Harlem, 1920s.
According to George Chauncey’s eponymous Gay New York, the Harlem Renaissance of the ’20s provided an opportunity for gay men to create their own social and cultural spaces within the burgeoning nightlife in the neighborhood. 

bluart106:

Two men dancing, Harlem, 1920s.

According to George Chauncey’s eponymous Gay New York, the Harlem Renaissance of the ’20s provided an opportunity for gay men to create their own social and cultural spaces within the burgeoning nightlife in the neighborhood. 

(Source: howpeoplelived)

via griph.
Photo 18 Oct 268 notes the-two-germanys:

There is so much “Devil” in the best of us…Postcard, Deutsches Reich / United States of America.

the-two-germanys:

There is so much “Devil” in the best of us…
Postcard, Deutsches Reich / United States of America.

Photo 17 Oct 78 notes centuriespast:

Alejandro de RiquerSpanish, 1856 - 1920
Ayuntamiento de Barcelona (Third Barcelona Exhibition of Fine and Industrial Arts), 1896
Offset lithograph
Bell Gallery

centuriespast:

Alejandro de Riquer
Spanish, 1856 - 1920
Ayuntamiento de Barcelona (Third Barcelona Exhibition of Fine and Industrial Arts), 1896
Offset lithograph
Bell Gallery
via C.P..
Photo 17 Oct 18 notes humanoidhistory:

A poster for a chapter of the Flash Gordon film serial (1936).

humanoidhistory:

A poster for a chapter of the Flash Gordon film serial (1936).

Photo 16 Oct 35 notes vintascope:

Amandines de Provence, poster by Leonetto Cappiello, 1900

vintascope:

Amandines de Provence, poster by Leonetto Cappiello, 1900

via Vintascope.
Photo 16 Oct 118 notes humanoidhistory:

1920 Soviet education poster: “In order to have more, it is necessary to produce more. In order to produce more, it is necessary to know more.” Designed by Alexander Nikolaevich Zelenskiy (1882—1942).

humanoidhistory:

1920 Soviet education poster: “In order to have more, it is necessary to produce more. In order to produce more, it is necessary to know more.” Designed by Alexander Nikolaevich Zelenskiy (1882—1942).

Photo 15 Oct 130 notes usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. Today’s staff member is Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Here’s his explanation of why his favorite record is a particular Purple Heart at the Truman Presidential Library and Museum:"Nearly two million of them have been issued over the years, but the story behind this particular medal is what really affected me the first time I saw it. Simply put, a distraught father who lost his son in the Korean War sent the posthumous medal, with accompanying letter, back to Truman. It’s a succinct, yet devastating letter to read and if I remember the story correctly Truman in turn kept the letter and medal close, with staff finding it in his personal office desk after he passed in 1972.""That simple display, it hits you right when you leave the gallery at the Harry S. Truman Library & Museum , knocked me out and has stuck with me since I first saw it. I can’t imagine the burden of such leadership; the stress, the second guessing, and the memories you’ll carry until you die.”"On that same trip I swung through Hannibal, where Tom tricked me into painting a fence."Image: Letter to Truman from distraught father:http://www.trumanlibrary.org/exhibit_documents/index.php?tldate=1953-00-00&groupid=5118&pagenumber=1&collectionid=korea.

usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. 

Today’s staff member is Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Here’s his explanation of why his favorite record is a particular Purple Heart at the Truman Presidential Library and Museum:

"Nearly two million of them have been issued over the years, but the story behind this particular medal is what really affected me the first time I saw it. Simply put, a distraught father who lost his son in the Korean War sent the posthumous medal, with accompanying letter, back to Truman. It’s a succinct, yet devastating letter to read and if I remember the story correctly Truman in turn kept the letter and medal close, with staff finding it in his personal office desk after he passed in 1972."

"That simple display, it hits you right when you leave the gallery at the Harry S. Truman Library & Museum , knocked me out and has stuck with me since I first saw it. I can’t imagine the burden of such leadership; the stress, the second guessing, and the memories you’ll carry until you die.”

"On that same trip I swung through Hannibal, where Tom tricked me into painting a fence."

Image: Letter to Truman from distraught father:http://www.trumanlibrary.org/exhibit_documents/index.php?tldate=1953-00-00&groupid=5118&pagenumber=1&collectionid=korea.

Video 12 Oct 67 notes

gov-info:

CSPAN Gov Doc: Origins of the Cell Phone

In 1973, Martin “Marty” Cooper, a Motorola researcher, invented the first true cell phone—the DynaTAC, and brought forth the most ubiquitous technology on the planet. It is estimated that the number of cell phones in use in 2014 will actually exceed the world population of seven billion.
In this CSPAN video, Art Molella, the director of the Smithsonian Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, (who has written on the subject), talks to Cooper about the evolution and history of his invention.
Molella’s blogged about Smithsonian blog post
Image: Journalist Lucy W. Morgan uses a cell phone and video camera, ca. 1985. State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory.
Photo 12 Oct 56 notes vintascope:

Yiddish WWI poster

vintascope:

Yiddish WWI poster

via Vintascope.
Photo 11 Oct 166 notes japonesices:

Sugiura Hisui, Colour litograph, 1927 on Flickr.
Click image for 539 x 800 size.  Celebration poster for the subway that goes from Ueno to Asakusa (downtown Tokyo) - the only subway train you see in East Asia… (Thanks to Paula Wirth for translating!)Sugiura Hisui, “The Only Subway in the East”. Colour litograph, Japanese, 1927. Scanned from "Art Deco 1910-1939" edited by Charlotte Benton, Tim Benton and Chislaine Wood.

japonesices:

Sugiura Hisui, Colour litograph, 1927 on Flickr.

Click image for 539 x 800 size.

Celebration poster for the subway that goes from Ueno to Asakusa (downtown Tokyo) - the only subway train you see in East Asia… (Thanks to Paula Wirth for translating!)

Sugiura Hisui, “The Only Subway in the East”. Colour litograph, Japanese, 1927.

Scanned from "Art Deco 1910-1939" edited by Charlotte Benton, Tim Benton and Chislaine Wood.

Photo 10 Oct 5,969 notes vintageblackglamour:

Melba Roy, NASA Mathmetician, at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland in 1964. Ms. Roy, a 1950 graduate of Howard University, led a group of NASA mathmeticians known as “computers” who tracked the Echo satellites. The first time I shared Ms. Roy on VBG, my friend Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a former postdoc in astrophysics at NASA, helpfully explained what Ms. Roy did in the comment section. I am sharing Chanda’s comment again here: “By the way, since I am a physicist, I might as well explain a little bit about what she did: when we launch satellites into orbit, there are a lot of things to keep track of. We have to ensure that gravitational pull from other bodies, such as other satellites, the moon, etc. don’t perturb and destabilize the orbit. These are extremely hard calculations to do even today, even with a machine-computer. So, what she did was extremely intense, difficult work. The goal of the work, in addition to ensuring satellites remained in a stable orbit, was to know where everything was at all times. So they had to be able to calculate with a high level of accuracy. Anyway, that’s the story behind orbital element timetables”. Photo: NASA/Corbis.

vintageblackglamour:

Melba Roy, NASA Mathmetician, at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland in 1964. Ms. Roy, a 1950 graduate of Howard University, led a group of NASA mathmeticians known as “computers” who tracked the Echo satellites. The first time I shared Ms. Roy on VBG, my friend Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a former postdoc in astrophysics at NASA, helpfully explained what Ms. Roy did in the comment section. I am sharing Chanda’s comment again here: “By the way, since I am a physicist, I might as well explain a little bit about what she did: when we launch satellites into orbit, there are a lot of things to keep track of. We have to ensure that gravitational pull from other bodies, such as other satellites, the moon, etc. don’t perturb and destabilize the orbit. These are extremely hard calculations to do even today, even with a machine-computer. So, what she did was extremely intense, difficult work. The goal of the work, in addition to ensuring satellites remained in a stable orbit, was to know where everything was at all times. So they had to be able to calculate with a high level of accuracy. Anyway, that’s the story behind orbital element timetables”. Photo: NASA/Corbis.

Photo 9 Oct 14 notes lbjlibrary:

October 9, 1964. Day 4 of the Whistle Stop! The Lady Bird Special has arrived in Florida, home of “Ambrosia.”

Lady Bird Johnson, did you really need talking points about your own damn state? 

lbjlibrary:

October 9, 1964. Day 4 of the Whistle Stop! The Lady Bird Special has arrived in Florida, home of “Ambrosia.”

Lady Bird Johnson, did you really need talking points about your own damn state? 

Photo 7 Oct 10,764 notes smithsonianlibraries:

In the wee hours of Wednesday morning, North America, Australia, western Asia and most of the Pacific Ocean will be treated to a full lunar eclipse in which the moon takes on a reddish hue as it passes through the Earth’s shadow.
We borrowed this moon image from The moon hoax, or a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings, an 1859 book that compiled the original six articles published in The Sun in 1835. A century before H.G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds induced panic about a Martian invasion of New Jersey, these six articles helped grow The Sun’s readership dramatically and establish it as a major New York newspaper. Read more about the fascinating history of The Great Moon Hoax on our blog. Rather listen to a podcast? The memory palace has an episode that might be of interest.

smithsonianlibraries:

In the wee hours of Wednesday morning, North America, Australia, western Asia and most of the Pacific Ocean will be treated to a full lunar eclipse in which the moon takes on a reddish hue as it passes through the Earth’s shadow.

We borrowed this moon image from The moon hoax, or a discovery that the moon has a vast population of human beings, an 1859 book that compiled the original six articles published in The Sun in 1835. A century before H.G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds induced panic about a Martian invasion of New Jersey, these six articles helped grow The Sun’s readership dramatically and establish it as a major New York newspaper. Read more about the fascinating history of The Great Moon Hoax on our blog. Rather listen to a podcast? The memory palace has an episode that might be of interest.

Photo 4 Oct 1,348 notes davidhudson:

Laika.

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